Retiring Mailman Writes Farewell Letter to Residents

"I’ve interacted with both the wealthy and the poor working in Manhattan … I believe that we can learn a great deal about ourselves and about life when we open up to the world around us."
Shiwen Rong August 7, 2018

In Manhattan, a United States Postal Service mailman wrote a heart-warming message to express his gratitude and say goodbye to his neighborhood before he retired.

July 26 was mailman Isoo Choi’s last day. He was a firefighter in South Korea, emigrated to the United States for his beloved wife.

Over the last 20 years, he’s carried mail for the USPS. Just like other days, he delivered the mail to his Upper East Side Residents. Only this time, he slipped a farewell letter into the postboxes of the residents on East 88th Street.

The letter reads, “I’ve learned and gained so much by encountering each of you and consider my life full and abundant. It is my prayer and hope and that your lives will also be full of peace and joy. It has been a privilege serving you as your mailman.”

“I learned a lot of things, from here and from different people, so really, I really want to express my thank to everyone, I gained, I learned, I am getting richer, my inner, I am a rich man.” Choi said.

For him, no matter how rich or poor we are, everyone has something to learn. It is the differences in people that make the world more exciting.

In his letter, he wrote: “I’ve interacted with both the wealthy and the poor working in Manhattan … I believe that we can learn a great deal about ourselves and about life when we open up to the world around us.”

(Courtesy of Isoo Choi)

“First of all, we have to open our hearts and learn to listen. Nowadays people don’t want to listen, they just argue what they think and what they want, which brings a lot of problems.”

The warm-hearted mailman has made a lot of friends in the community, including Fox’s news anchor Rosanna Scotto.

“The other day we met, she said, Choi, I can’t let you go like this!”

Resident Abby: “Just always pleasing to see him, was really beautiful about, Choi caring about us, and saying goodbye the way he did.”

Mr. Choi is very serious about his work and often helps people who receive and send letters in various ways.

Resident Ronit Hirschenboim: “If a package goes to the wrong building, he brings it back to us. It’s been great to have him around, we going to miss him.”

“The first country, lot of different people, different backgrounds, different cultures, different religions. But we make day by day, the history in this country. I love it, I really love it. That’s why America is a great country.” he said

As a first generation immigrant, Mr. Choi said he learned English on the street. He also encourages Asian immigrants to go out and communicate, and to not just stay in a small circle.

After retirement, Mr. Choi wants to travel to different countries, make friends with the world, and write a book about his life. However, his mother, who is far away in South Korea, feels that his son is still young.

“She (Mom) said, Choi now you have a lot of time, go back to school and finish your college.”